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The Upcycle Charity Challenge

A creative way to raise money for your favourite charity Calling all knitters, makers and crafting wizards! Our team has come up with a clever way to help reduce some of our excess stock and raise money for charity at the same time. We are challenging you to create some fabulous upcycled products using a…

Colony collapse cause for concern

Where have all the penguins gone? Over the last week a concerning report from Halley Bay has been making newspapers around the world. The bay is Antarctica’s second largest emperor penguin breeding ground. Or, at least, it was. After three years of very few actual births being recorded this year looks to be another…

All aboard: IAC team join scientists onboard Korean icebreaker

A select group of educators, scientists and students got a chance to step aboard Korean icebreaker the RV Araon late in March. Key members of the International Antarctic Centre team travelled to Lyttelton to see up close how the facilities in the research vessel were used down on the ice. Organised by a range of groups…

Future imperfect: Art and science combine in Antarctica

On the ice an intriguing art installation gives us a look into the world of tomorrow – and possibly inspires others towards making this future a brighter one. For something that has taken thousands of years to grow the acceleration of glacier loss in both New Zealand and Antarctica over the last couple of decades…

Breaking the Ice: a singular chance to see historical artefacts

A new exhibition is set to open in a couple of weeks at the Canterbury Museum and, with it, the one chance many will have to ever see up close the various items used by the first explorers in their battle against the inhospitable Antarctic landscape. Breaking the Ice: The First Year in Antarctica promises…

Jade Hameister

At the age of 14 her ‘polar quest’ began with a 150 km journey across thin ice to the North Pole. Then came a 550 km traverse of the Greenland icecap. By the age of 16 she had trekked 600 km from the Ross Ice Shelf to the South Pole. For Australian teenager Jade Hameister…

Lines in the ice: How the ‘bergs gain their stripes

No, this isn’t photoshop. These icebergs really are crossed with all types of weird and wonderful lines. These beautiful ‘artworks’ occur for a number of reasons, with different colours appearing due to different circumstances. Blue stripes are the most common. These appear when crevices are filled with water that freezes so quickly that bubbles in…

Shirase Nobu

Scorned at departure, celebrated upon return, Shirase Nobu would defy scepticism in Japan and abroad and, in doing so, forge a unique path into the heart of Antarctica. At age 11, Shirase Nobu would write in a diary of his obsession with the North and South poles. 38 years later he would set off…

Protecting the penguins

The wonderful discovery of a 1.5 million ‘mega-colony’ of Adélie penguins last year lifted the spirits of conservation guardians. Now the case is being made for greater protection measures around the colony and it’s surrounding environment. The Adélie penguin population monitored by scientists has dropped by 65% in the last 25 years. A Guardian article…

Reverse engineering…

The impressive Antarctic Snow Cruiser was meant to lead the way in the Antarctic expedition of Rear Admiral Richard Byrd in 1940. However when it came time to put in the work the cruiser was left spinning its wheels (quite literally). The Antarctic Snow Cruiser provides an interesting example of hubris on the ice,…

Film flippers: our 5 favourite penguin movies

Be it dancing or surfing, plodding or plotting, one thing’s for sure – penguins have plenty of star power on the silver screen. Here are our five favourite penguin movies. What are yours? 5) Surf’s Up. Released within a year of number 4) below, it could be said this film is Happy Feet, but with…

What a pile of…

The not-so-pretty preparation for climate change We weren’t sure what to believe when we first heard it, but it appears to be true – penguin poop is helping to change Antarctica’s ecosystem. Yes, according to this fascinating National Geographic story, the local gentoo penguins have delivered millions of pounds of “nutrient rich guano”…

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