Skip to primary navigation Skip to content Skip to footer

News

Read our latest blog posts here

Advance Antarctica Fair? A game-changing name-change

With new penguins arriving at the Centre we know just how important it is to get a name right. Which is why we appreciate the ‘journey’ the continent took before finally settling on a name in the late 19th century. To put it simply, Antarctica used to be called Australia. Then, in 1824, today’s Australia took…

Class act: Welcome Miranda Satterthwaite, our new Education Manager

Our new Education Manager has arrived and we’re thrilled to have her on board leading the class. We put a short list of questions in front of Miranda, expecting a few words or so in response. The depth of her answers speaks to the expertise and passion she is bringing to the role.   Why…

World record Baby, it’s cold outside

Last month we brought you five interesting world records set in Antarctica.  Since then we’ve been reminded of another… Eleven babies have been born in Antarctica, and none of them died as infants. Antarctica therefore has the lowest infant mortality rate of any continent: 0%. What’s crazier is why the babies were born there in the…

An epic adventure – the race across Antarctica

At the end of 2018 two men made an incredible journey into the record books, each individually following the path that original explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton had planned on his journey to the south pole and across the continent. In this day and age you could be forgiven for thinking most travel-related ‘firsts’ have been…

Flippering fantastic – Tubby turns 21!

In the wild the average lifespan for the Little Blue Penguin is 6.5 years. In truly exceptional cases these penguins have been recorded as living up to 25 years of age in captivity. That’s why we were so excited to celebrate Tubby’s 21st birthday on the 20th of January. It was a fantastic day…

Good on you, mates. The pride of the (very) south is back there.

The Antarctic Heritage Trust has recently returned a reconstructed beer barrel to Shackleton’s hut at Cape Royds. The barrel was donated in 1907 by the Speights brewery to Shackleton, making the journey south before being consumed, in all likelihood on the trip down. From there the barrel was probably repurposed and used outside the…

Indisputable. Unequivocal. Climate change is here.

As advocates for Antarctica our ears always prick up when news arrives of what’s happening in this important environment. A study published on January 14 this year highlights that ice is melting more than six times faster than it did in the 1980s. Using aerial photographs, satellite measurements and computer models scientists have tracked 176…

World leading – 5 records you didn’t know were set in Antarctica

Many people may know that Antarctica is the coldest, driest and windiest place on the planet. However there are some other interesting records it also holds.   1) Enter Sand Iceman Metallica made it into the 2015 Guiness World Records when they became the first musical act to perform a concert on every continent. The…

Depth charge: How penguins ‘fly’

The regular footage showing penguins seemingly flying out of the water and onto nearby ice floes is always exciting to watch, particularly if they’re doing so with a hungry seal or orca close behind. But just how do they get the speed to do so? Because of their widdly-waddly body shape penguins can’t exactly grapple…

Rear Admiral Richard E. Byrd

He was many things: esteemed pilot, Medal Of Honor winner, Arctic pioneer, logistical expert. However Byrd’s legacy is most known for efforts exploring the Antarctic. After a career in the United States Navy and service in the First World War, Richard Evelyn Byrd Jr would fly into history as a groundbreaking aviator, explorer and director…

Under the hood – the mighty mechanics at the heart of the Hägglund

Throughout history horses, huskies, tractors and snowmobiles have all been put to use going from A to B in Antarctica. But when you want to move cargo in the most demanding of conditions the most reliable way is in these Swedish-made over-snow vehicles. Driving out from base in the Antarctic is always carefully managed. In…

Captain Robert Falcon Scott

Captain Scott is known for beating and in turn being beaten by the perils of the Antarctic. The histories of Antarctica and Captain Robert Falcon Scott will forever be intertwined, his story inspiring and cautionary, stirring and tragic. Scott’s Discovery expedition in 1901 had discovered a vast and incredibly challenging landscape. That journey made the…

Skip to toolbar